geoff

geoff


Notice: Undefined property: JObject::$description in /home/insumcom/public_html/templates/max/html/com_k2/default/user.php on line 59

Unconditional Positive Regard

Thursday, 03 December 2015 00:00

Unconditional positive regard is primarily associated with Carl Rogers (1902 – 1987), American psychologist and one of the founders of the humanistic approach/client-centred approach to psychology.  Rogers believed that unconditional positive regard is essential to healthy development.

 It is:

About valuing a person as doing their best;  about respecting that person

Basic acceptance and support of a person regardless of what he says or does (as long as it does not cause harm)

The belief that everyone has the potential to improve, to change

Consciously seeking to find the best in others

 It does not mean:

You need to like the person nor approve of what they do

You just smile and nod

 “Just putting up with him”

 

Unconditional positive regard:

Provides the best possible conditions for personal growth

Needs to be genuine … “if you are not genuine, your conditional regard will always leak out”

Brings out the best in others and the best in self

 

Adapted from the work of Carl Rogers, David Myers, Alex Lickerman, Stephen Joseph    

Positive Language

Wednesday, 04 November 2015 00:00


“Positive words lead to positive emotions lead to positive actions lead to positive words to positive emotions to positive actions …”

Barbara Fredrickson, David Cooperrider, Diana Whitney, Martin Seligman, et al

 

Words are the basic building blocks of language.  We use words to build sentences and paragraphs, ideas, and to make conversation.  Language allows us to structure and understand our own thoughts and feelings and to communicate intelligibly with others.

The words we choose reveal a lot about our attitudes and thoughts, and affect the people around us.  Our words can inspire, influence, bring hope or they can keep people down.  Our words can keep ourselves down.

We can make great strides toward living a more positive life by learning how to frame our thoughts, ideas and words in more positive terms.  To cultivate positive language, we need to think before we speak and censor ourselves, edit our written communications more carefully, and commit to being more conscious (and conscientious) about the words we use.

With a little practice, we can use our words to turn a negative into a positive.  Learn how to choose words thoughtfully, and eventually your thoughts and behaviours will become as positive as your language.


 

Positivity and Positive Practices

Sunday, 25 October 2015 00:00

Positivity produces success in life as much as it reflects success in life. Positivity works to broaden and build our lives. Broadening refers to the opening of the mind with increased attention, creativity and decisiveness. Building refers to the ability to craft a better life.

Research shows the benefits of positive practices include:

  • Increased resilience; increased ability to bounce back from stress
  • Increased curiosity and visioning
  • Expanded attention and thinking
  • Increased creativity and receptivity to others’ ideas
  • Increased scope for thought and action
  • Increased appreciation of others
  • Increased openness to possibility
  • Increased resourcefulness
“It takes courage to choose the positive as a daily leadership practice – especially in the face of poor performance. It is hard to let go of the tendency to criticise and instead be positive, caring and supportive.”
Diana Whitney

Seven reasons to be generous with appreciation: (Diana Whitney)

  1. Recognition lets people know they are on the right track; recognition is an investment not a reward
  2. Appreciation communicates and reinforces your values
  3. Compliments foster a positive emotional environment
  4. Gratitude is a verbal immune boost; it is good for your health
  5. Praise is good for the health of others
  6. Acknowledgment creates a sense of safety
  7. Gratitude encourages risk taking and experimentation

Mindfulness

Thursday, 15 October 2015 00:00
“Rest is prior to motion and stillness prior to action"
Taoist philosophy

Ariana Huffington is best known for her news website, Huffington Post. Her recently released book, "Thrive," explores wellbeing, wisdom, wonder and giving, dedicating a significant portion of her writing to the beneficial impact of mindfulness on wellbeing. Why mindfulness and wellbeing?

“There is a need to disconnect from our always-connected lives and reconnect with ourselves.”
Ariana Huffington

Coaching and Mindset

Wednesday, 07 October 2015 00:00

Mindset is enormously powerful and affects motivation, aspiration and achievement. A coachee’s mindset will impact the success of a coaching conversation; a coach’s mindset will also impact the success of a coaching conversation.

Some people see talents, skills and ability as fixed assets; things they were largely born with and which are mostly fixed in their extent. That is, you either have it or you don’t. This is known as a fixed mindset.

People with a fixed mindset may view themselves as entitled or superior. They tend to see failure as an indicator of lacking ability or talent; as meaning they are no longer clever, creative, talented, etc. Hence they will be less likely to take on challenges and risks. People with a fixed mindset tend to underperform. (Carol Dweck, 2008)

Our third newsletter about the recent World Congress of Positive Psychology focuses on a number of key messages shared by a variety of speakers. With each of these key messages, questions are posed for you to consider. We suggest that you might ponder one key message [with the associated question(s)] at a time, and at a pace that is beneficial for you:

“The average describes, while the best prescribes. Studying the best makes excellence accessible to all of us.” Tal Ben-Shahar

  • How do you make excellence accessible for yourself and for those you lead and interact with?

“Human systems move in the direction of the questions asked.” David Cooperrider
  • What questions are you asking?

On Monday, 14th September 2015 insium participated in the fourth veski “inspiring women” professional development and networking event. insium director and founder Dina Pozzo was joined on the stage of the Spring Street Conference Centre by Natalie Collard (Corporate Affairs Manager, Victoria/Tasmania, Telstra), Dr David Farmer (Postdoctoral Research Officer, Neurophysiology Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience & Mental Health), Michelle Gallaher (Co-Founder/Creative Director, The Social Science), Dr Suzanne Miller (ARC Future Fellow, Senior Scientist, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University) and Jack Walden (CEO, the c word). The panel was MC’d by Madeleine McManus (Director Industry Engagement, Monash University).

The focus of this month's newsletter is my learning from the WCPP2015 The Power and Possibilities of High Quality Connections at Work workshop facilitated by Jane Dutton, Co-founder of Centre for Positive Organizations, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

Jane posed 2 key questions at the beginning of the workshop:
* Why do people flourish in some organisations and not others?
* Why do you flourish in some organisations and not others?
based on the core claim that more high quality connections (HQCs) between people during the day foster individual, team and collective flourishing.

HQCs are energising; they are mutual and each person holds the other in positive regard. The value of HQCs at work include1:
- Increased well-being
- Enhanced physiological resources
- Greater cognitive functioning
- Increased trust
- Increased learning
- Increase resilience
- Increased commitment and engagement
- Increased creativity
- Increased shared knowledge and goals, resulting in increased quality and performance

Page 5 of 5