insium's newsletter on leadership: September, 2016

Written by Wednesday, 21 September 2016 00:00
Published in Newsletter

Organisational Courage

Courage is a pattern of constructive opposition, in which an individual stands against social forces in order to remedy duress in the organisation.

Monica Worline, 2012

The VIA strengths of courage are bravery, perseverance, honesty and zest; practising these strengths have resulted in the following organisational benefits:

  • Improved accountability and responsibility
  • More effective working relationships
  • Increased self-efficacy and self-confidence
  • Broadened perception of what is possible and improved resourcefulness
  • Increased goal achievement
  • Increased ability to learn from mistakes
  • Increased positive energy, positive mood, empathy and conscientiousness
  • Increased prosocial orientation
  • Inspired others to act courageously 

Adapted from the works of Haidt (2002); Herman (1971); Hitz & Driscol (1989), Huhnke (1984); McQuaid& Lawn (2014); Peterson & Seligman (2004); Ryan & Deci (2000); Shepela, Cook, Horlitz, Leal, Luciano & Lufty (1997)

How do you build courage in your organisation?  A few ideas for your consideration that can be easily implemented include:

Up!

Wednesday, 24 August 2016 00:00
Published in Blog

I recently tweeted about the following clip and thought I would write a very short piece about how you might like to consider using this clip in a strengths and/or wellbeing workshop.

This short clip (less than 5 minutes) from the animated movie, “Up!”, can be found here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTDP-A--BhE

 

insium's newsletter on leadership: August, 2016

Written by Wednesday, 10 August 2016 00:00
Published in Newsletter

Courage:

The willingness to act towards a moral or worthwhile goal despite the presence of risk, uncertainty and fear

Robert Biswas-Diener, 2012

The VIA strengths of courage are bravery, perseverance, honesty and zest.  The benefits of these strengths include:

  • Healthy positive relationships
  • Taking personal responsibility for one’s actions
  • Increased tolerance for ambiguity
  • Increased resilience, personal growth and achievement
  • Increased trust
  • Increased happiness and wellbeing
  • Increased inclusiveness
  • Fuller expression of abilities, skills and talents
  • Increased resourcefulness
  • Increased self-confidence 

Adapted from Peterson & Seligman (2004)

 

While the following short clip depicts the courage of Buzz Lightyear:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czgmiqhgMCQ

courage is not purely the domain of the heroes in the world - ordinary people have courage too. (Lopez, Rasmussen, Skorupski, Koetting, Petersen, & Yang, 2010).  And yet, being courageous … requires courage.